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Broome County Jail

155 Lt Vanwinkle Drive
Binghamton, NY 13905

Interview with Thomas

JM: How long was your sentencing for?
Thomas: 3 years flat 2 years post release supervision

JM: Did you spend time in a holding cell after your sentencing? If so, what was that like? If you didn't where did they they take you instead?
Thomas: i was taken back to Bcj then a week later put on a bus to elmira state prison for classification then sent to fishkill

Background 

Located in the town of Dickinson, New York. This facility, built in 1996, houses up to 536 inmates. The 16 year old jail has received numerous awards and accreditations from the NYS Commission of Corrections, NYS Sheriff Association and the National Commission on Correctional Healthcare. In 2000 the facility was updated with a courthouse holding area. This was built to reduce the amount of travel costs of transporting criminals from one location to the other while they await trial. In additional so reducing costs it is also a security measure designed to increase the security of the inmates as well as the public. 

Beginning in 1999 Broome County Jail implemented double celling. By having two inmates per cell the procedure amounted to a significant savings to taxpayers in every year since it's inception.  

Broome County has a well established Weekender Work program which has provided numerous benefits to the community as a whole. The program was originally designed to provide free labor to the municipal governments and tax-exempt organizations in the community while simultaneously free up bed space for weekend offenders. The program has expanded in recent decades to include setup and clean up of county wide celebrations as well as beautification projects when the county hosts the Empire State games. The Office of the Sheriff in Broome County has always felt strongly that inmates have a responsibility to the community beyond incarceration and programs like these help to reenforce those views. 




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